Deprecated: Function Elementor\DB::is_built_with_elementor is deprecated since version 3.2.0! Use Plugin::$instance->documents->get( $post_id )->is_built_with_elementor() instead. in /mnt/data/vhosts/casite-598751.cloudaccess.net/httpdocs/wp-includes/functions.php on line 5379
Voucher Bills Filed This Session - The Parents Campaign

Voucher Bills Filed This Session

Vouchers, Tax Credit Scholarships, Opportunity Scholarships, and More 
 

The following bills have been introduced in the 2014 Legislative Session; all are designed to divert taxpayer dollars from public schools to private schools. Public schools operate under the most stringent standards of government accountability and transparency; private schools are completely unaccountable to taxpayers for the public dollars that go into their coffers. Vouchers have been shown to be ineffective in states that have tried them. 

Ask legislators to vote NO on vouchers, tax credit scholarships, or other schemes to divert taxpayer dollars from public schools to private schools. Click here to find contact information for the legislators who represent your school district. 

 
End of session update (as of 4/2/14): all of the voucher and tax credit scholarship bills introduced in the 2014 session were defeated or died in committee or on House/Senate calendars.

 

HB 592  (Authored by Reps. Moore, Alday, Boyd, Carpenter, Chism, Denny, and Martinson) (DEAD)
Opportunity Scholarships and Open Enrollment – Diverts funds from the State Treasury to pay for private school tuition
  • “School choice” bill that establishes open enrollment among public schools statewide and creates tax credits for private school tuition that will cost the state up to $10-million annually
  • Allows transfers between schools within a district and transfers from the resident district to any other district of the parent’s choice, with funds to follow the student
  • Provides up to $10-million in tax credits to businesses and corporations that contribute to scholarships for low-income students from schools rated D or F to attend an approved private school, online school, or pre-kindergarten program
  • Directs the State Board of Education to select a scholarship granting organization to administer the program 

See related ALEC bill:  Great Schools Scholarship Tax Credits  
   

SB 2209 (Authored by Sen. Gandy) (DEAD)

Opportunity Scholarships and Open Enrollment – Diverts funds from the State Treasury to pay for private school tuition
  • Allows students in D- or F-rated schools to transfer to another school within their district or to another district, with funds to follow the student
  • Provides up to $10-million in tax credits to businesses and corporations that contribute to scholarships for low-income students from schools rated D or F to attend an approved private school
  • Directs the State Board of Education to select a scholarship granting organization to administer the program 

See related ALEC bill:  Great Schools Scholarship Tax Credits 

SB 2595 (Authored by Sen. Watson) (DEAD)

Mississippi Education Improvement Tax Credits – Diverts up to $92-million from the State Treasury to pay for private school tuition
  • Establishes a tax credit program to be administered by the Mississippi Development Authority for the purpose of providing up to $92-million in tax credits to businesses and corporations that contribute to scholarships for low- and middle-income students to attend any private, online, or home school in the state
  • 75 percent of funds in the program must be directed toward organizations that provide scholarships for nonpublic schools
  • 25 percent of funds must go educational improvement organizations that provide assistance to public traditional or charter schools
See related ALEC bill:  Great Schools Scholarship Tax Credits 
   
SB 2596 (Authored by Sen. Watson) (DEAD)
Mississippi Opportunity Scholarships – Diverts MAEP funds to pay for private school tuition
  • Requires the state to pay directly to parents funds to cover the costs of private school tuition
  • State funds are diverted from the MAEP allocation intended for the student’s resident school district
  • Allows for student transfer to a nonresident school district with funds to follow the student
  • Requires the resident district to provide transportation up to 10 miles to the chosen school in the nonresident district
  • Establishes a separate bureaucracy to manage the program, including a paid executive director and staff
  • The first two years of the program will be limited to low-income children residing in attendance zones of the lowest performing 20 percent of schools in the state
  • Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year the program will be open to all low- and middle-income children throughout the state regardless of their schools’ performance classification  
See related ALEC bill: Parental Choice Scholarship Program 

SB 2639
 (Authored by Sens. Watson and Sojourner) (DEAD)
Education Savings Scholarship Accounts – Diverts MAEP funds to pay for private school tuition
  • Sets up a program for a student’s MAEP funds and local ad valorem taxes to be transferred into individual student education savings accounts
  • Parents agree to use the funds for private school, online/virtual school, home school, or other education services in at least the subjects of reading, grammar, mathematics, social studies, and science
  • Includes no verification of school attendance or accountability other than the parent’s signed agreement
  • Sets no limit on the number of participating students or on the amount of taxpayer funds that can be diverted from MAEP or local ad valorem collections to privately held individual accounts
See related ALEC bill:  Education Savings Account Act  
   
SB 2280 & SB 2749 (Authored by Sens. Hill and Watson) (DEAD)
Income Tax Deduction for Private or Home School – Divert funds from the State Treasury to pay for private or home school expenses
  • Both of these bills deplete the State Treasury by creating a state income tax deduction for private school tuition or home school expenses
  • SB 2280 allows a per household deduction up to $1,000
  • SB 2749 allows a per household deduction up to $5,000
 SB 2325 & HB 765 (Authored by Sen. Collins and Rep. Crawford) (DEAD)
Individualized Education Funds – Divert funds from the State Treasury to pay private school tuition for students with special needs
  • These are companion bills that shift state funding to private or online schools for students with special needs
  • Participating nonpublic schools are not held accountable for the quality of education they provide to special needs students and are not required to provided special education services at all, despite being paid for by taxpayer funds
  • Mandate payments to Individualized Education Funds (IEFs) for students with special needs at an amount equal to the MAEP base student cost plus the proportionate share of funds for categorical aid programs
  • Students are eligible who have either an IEP (Individualized Education Program) or a 504 accommodation (both bills amended to remove 504 accommodations)
  • SB 2325 allows the participation of up to 2,500 students with a 504 accommodation and places no limit on the number of IEP students receiving vouchers (amended to limit participation)
  • HB 765 limits the program to 500 students with a 504 accommodation and places no limit on the number of IEP participants (amended to limit participation)

HB 529 (Authored by Rep. Crawford) (DEAD)
Exceptional Children Scholarships – Diverts funds from the State Treasury to pay private school tuition for children with disabilities

  • Allows per-student scholarships of up to $3,400 annually for exceptional children attending private schools

HB 831 (Authored by Rep. Barker) (DEAD)
Speech-Language Therapy Scholarships – Diverts funds from the State Treasury to pay private school tuition for children with speech-language impairments

  • Expands existing speech-language scholarship program to divert additional state funding to special purpose schools

HB 562 (Authored by Rep. Barker) (DEAD)

Autism Therapy Scholarships – Diverts funds from the State Treasury to pay for services at a private, special purpose school for students with autism and creates broad new instructional requirements for all elementary students
  • Establishes scholarships for students with an eligibility ruling of autism spectrum disorder to receive services from a private, special purpose school
  • Creates unfunded mandates for public schools: 1) requires autism screening for all children before the end of first grade and 2) establishes comprehensive new requirements for all students in grades kindergarten through six, not just those with autism, regarding placement of students and determination of instructional levels
Note from Rep. Barker about HB 562: “This bill is not intended to be a voucher bill; it is intended to begin a preliminary discussion about state support for families with children with autism.”

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.